Charcoal Toothpaste from the Perspective of Your Teeth

There is always something strange and new hitting the marketplace. While some of them turn out as positive, others start out a little strange. You have probably already seen activated charcoal products on television and social media, but have they finally gone too far by putting it in toothpaste?

Yes, there is Wow Factor

Yes, they have shown that activated charcoal has benefits when it is put into face masks, but a face mask doesn’t go in your mouth. Recently, people have seen strange images plastered across social media of people brushing their teeth with a dark black paste advertised as activated charcoal toothpaste.

Let’s be honest, if you have seen the ads for this type of product, you have stopped scrolling to look. It caught your attention and held it for at least 30 seconds. Why? Because when you look at someone’s smile, you are expecting to see a set of beautiful,¬†pearly white teeth. It has the wow factor manufacturers are looking for, but just like any other strange product, there are skeptics. However, when it comes to your oral hygiene, you shouldn’t care what skeptics have to say, you should care about what your teeth have to say. After all, they are what really matters, right?

The Benefits of Charcoal Toothpaste

There is no scientific evidence of whether brushing your teeth with charcoal is effective or not. Currently, it is labeled a fad because people who have done it, say it works. Of course, they say it works because if they didn’t, they would look silly for doing it.

Some people claim it removes stains on teeth and that it removes discoloration as well. However, there is no evidence that this is true other than reports from those seeking home remedies.

The makers of charcoal toothpaste also claim that it reduces surface stains without bleaching. However, this is where any ‘evidence’ ends.

The only evidence that supports using activated charcoal as a remedy is when it is used by medical personnel to reduce the effects of poisoning or drug overdose. The activated charcoal binds to the drug or toxin and helps flush them from the body. This is not evidence that provides any benefit when you use it in toothpaste.

Possible Risks of Brushing with Charcoal Toothpaste

There are several risks you face when you decide to brush with activated charcoal. Unfortunately, not all the risks are known at this time. Even though it has not been fully researched, there are some concerns that your tacoma wa dental services want you to know about using this type of toothpaste, or any toothpaste that has not been researched. These are the primary concerns with this type of product.

If charcoal toothpaste is used regularly, the abrasiveness can seriously damage tooth enamel, and it can cause extensive damage to gum tissue. Activated charcoal can absorb things you want in your body. If you take medications, you will want to keep them in your body at a therapeutic level. However, activated charcoal can absorb these medications from your body, and pull them from your bloodstream. In cases where the medication is necessary to sustain life, this can be very detrimental to your health. Even though some people recommend the product because they use it, even they report some after effects from it. One of the most notable after effects is difficulty washing away the black residue completely to avoid stains. Another is constipation, dark colored stools, and according to previous research completed on activated charcoal, intestinal blockage.

There has been extensive research completed on activated charcoal to aid in treating patients who have overdosed, and who have been poisoned. However, this research was focused on the question of ‘do the benefits outweigh the risk of not providing this treatment,’ not whether the treatment was completely safe. There are risks associated with putting any foreign material into the body but activated charcoal can be dangerous if it is used in situations where it is not medically necessary. Any whitening effect that has been reported from using activated charcoal in toothpaste is speculation. There is no research into the effectiveness, and there is no scientifically accepted data backing any claim provided by manufacturers, or users of this product.

The Opinion of the American Dental Association

If you are looking to develop a brighter, whiter smile, do not turn to home remedies. Until there is evidence that charcoal based toothpaste is safe the ADA will not provide their seal of approval on the product.

Their recommendations include:

Brushing your teeth twice each day

Floss twice each day

Avoiding foods and drinks that will stain your teeth

Only use products that have the ADA seal of approval

Along with these recommendations, you should make sure to keep the appointments with your dentist for cleanings and a check of all your teeth. This appointment should be scheduled every six months to ensure that your dentist catches any potential problems you may face regarding your oral health. Your teeth are too important to take lightly.